Facebook Groups for Flutists

Facebook has gotten a bad rap with a lot of people. They are constantly changing the new feed algorithm to manipulate which posts you see. Facebook also isn’t as popular as other social media platforms.

Hannah B Flute | Facebook Flute Groups

There is one thing that Facebook excels in: groups. Facebook groups work similarly to online forums, except you can use your Facebook profile. I am a member of quite a few Facebook groups for flutists, and I love being able to ask questions and share my insights with others.

Not every flute group will benefit every flutist, so in today’s post, I am going to give a brief description of each group. I will also include the type of flutist that I think would benefit from each group.

Flute Forum

I have to start with what is possibly the biggest flute group on Facebook. Flute Forum is a public group, which means you don’t need to be a member to see posts and comments. You do need to be a member to post your own questions and comments.

This group is run by a couple guys at Weissman Music in New York. They offer repair services as well as flute sales. Because of this, you will see sales pitches from time to time, but the majority of posts are from forum members.

Perfect for: any flutist looking to connect with others online

Not for: people who do not want to ask or answer questions

Join here.

New Again Flutist

This group used to be known as Facebook Flutist Network. A few months ago, the admins decided to make it a place for flutists who were returning to the instrument after a hiatus.

You can find and share tips for returning flute players as well as get help and advice from some of the pros. While I am not a returning flutist, I love getting to share tips and tricks with one of my favorite groups of flute players.

This is a closed group, meaning you can only see posts if you are a member.

Perfect for: flutists returning to the flute, pros looking to give advice

Not for: long time flutists who do not want to answer questions

Join here.

Flutist Facebook Association

This group is a great place to share recordings, articles, and other promotions with other flutists. It is a small group, and it is closed, but it is a good place to learn about up and coming flutists.

You can find new musicians to follow, and you can share your own work. This is not the most popular group, but it is a good outlet for sharing and finding other flutists.

Perfect for: flutists looking to find other musicians and share their work

Not for: asking a ton of questions

Join here.

Flute Players International

This group functions similarly to Flutist Facebook Association, except it is a public group. You can share posts as with FFA, but people do not have to be members to see your posts.

You can find new and emerging flutists and share your own recordings and works with others. Flutists from all over the world can share their stuff here, and you can learn from all of them.

Perfect for: sharing your work and finding new flutists to follow

Not for: asking a ton of questions

Join here.

Flute Tips Group

This group is for sharing and learning tips for the flute. Ads are not allowed in this group, so you can be sure that you are getting good tips, no strings attached. The group is not as active as some, but it fills a nice niche.

Most of the posts are people sharing tips, but you can also ask others for tips and solutions to problems. This group is a public group, so you can see the posts without being a member.

Perfect for: finding and sharing flute related tips

Not for: selling or promoting products, services, etc.

Join here.

Piccolo Page

If you play piccolo or want to learn about it, this is the group for you. It was based on the concept of Flute Forum, but it’s for piccolo. The group is still small and not very active, but it is a good resource for new piccolo players.

It is a public group, so you can check it out to see what sorts of posts are shared before you ask to join. A lot of the bigger flute groups can get bogged down, and Piccolo Page fills a void just for piccolo players.

Perfect for: piccolo players and enthusiasts

Not for: flutists who have not interest in the piccolo

Join here.

Low Flutes

Just as Piccolo Page exists for piccolo players, the group Low Flutes was started for flutists who also play alto, bass, and other flutes below than the concert flute.

The group, which is public, is run by Chris Potter, one of the most influential low flutes specialists. As with other groups, you can post questions, comments, and share links to performances and other works. If you are looking into alto and/or bass flute, this group is a great resource!

Perfect for: flutists looking to learn alto and bass flutes

Not for: flutists who aren’t interested in the low flutes

Join here.

Flutes for Sale

This public group is great if you are looking to sell or buy a used flute. You can post listings of any flutes you are looking to sell, and you can connect with potential buyers.

If you are looking to buy a flute, you can search for active listings that fit your needs. You can messages the seller of a flute you are interested in, and you can even buy through the Facebook marketplace.

Perfect for: flutists looking to sell or buy instruments online

Not for: flutists who have G.A.S. (gear acquisition syndrome)

Join here.

So…

These are just a few of the many flute related groups that you can join on Facebook. Each group has a slightly different purpose than the last, so you can probably find the group for you.

Are you in any Facebook groups for flutists? Let me know your favorites in the comments! And be sure to check out my previous post here.

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Shopping on Amazon for Flutists

Amazon has become a haven for online shopping. You can purchase anything on there, from a new computer to a pair of socks. That also means that you can purchase music related items from Amazon.

Since you can find just about anything on Amazon, you have to be smart about what you do buy. There are some scams on there as well as some subpar products. In this post, we are going to talk about how to avoid those scams and stick to the good stuff.

Hannah B Flute | Shopping on Amazon for Flutists

I have personally used Amazon to purchase a lot of music stuff, everything from sheet music to instruments themselves. So I have quite a bit of experience when it comes to using Amazon to further my music goals.

So here’s how to use Amazon for flutists.

DISCLAIMER: This post includes affiliate links. To read my full disclosure policy, click here.

Fulfillment by Amazon.

The first thing you need to know about is Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA). This program lets individual sellers buy products that Amazon then sells for them.

That means these products qualify for free two day shipping (with Prime), and Amazon handles all questions and complaints for these orders, too. You don’t have to deal with a shady seller who wants to con you out of your money.

When you go to a listing, you can see the different options for pricing.

For example: New (1) for $25.99.

Then you can see the different prices you can pay for the item you want. To tell if something is sold by an independent seller but managed and shipped by Amazon, look for the Fulfillment By Amazon sign.

Hannah B Flute | Fulfillment By Amazon

Another benefit of the FBA program is that you get to work with Amazon’s customer service team if there are any issues. A lot of companies lack in the area of customer service, so returns and exchanges can be a hassle. But Amazon has great customer service, and you get all the benefits of it.

Verify Any Instrument Purchases.

The only reputable flute brand that allows Amazon to sell their flutes that I know of is Pearl Flutes. Pearl has Amazon listed as an authorized dealer on the Pearl website.

That is not the case with other brands. Some, such as Gemeinhardt, specify that Amazon is NOT an authorized dealer. Others, such as Yamaha and Jupiter do not specify either way.

Before you purchase an instrument that is hundreds if not thousands of dollars, verify that it is a legit sale. Amazon is a good company, but they are not authorized to sell certain flute brands. If you find a listing for Gemeinhardt, that listing will not be up to the quality standards set by the flute company.

If you want to purchase a flute online but Amazon is not an authorized dealer, try and stick to other websites. Flute World and Flute Center of New York (FCNY) sell almost any brand of flute, completely online.

You can buy these other flutes from Amazon, but be aware that the purchase may not go as smoothly as it would with another website that is an authorized dealer of your chosen flute.

Get Sheet Music, Fast.

If you don’t have a huge music store close by, you will probably have to go to the internet to get the music you need. You can get some stuff from local music stores, but online give you more options.

Amazon has a ton of sheet music for flute, both for the Kindle and shipped to you. You can order with Prime and get sheet music in two days. It’s pretty amazing. Other online music stores usually have longer shipping times. If you’re in a pinch, Amazon is a good resource.

Now, you won’t find as much or as many editions as you would on a site like Flute World, but Amazon does have the basics. I have had to order from other websites when looking for a specific edition, but I tend to go with Amazon when I can.

You can’t really beat free shipping.

Save Those Gift Cards.

Everyone uses Amazon. And everyone gives Amazon gift cards. It’s a great go to gift. If you are looking at purchasing something more expensive on Amazon (like a verified flute), save those gift cards.

Over a few years, I managed to save a little over $200 in Amazon and Visa gift cards, which knocked down the price of my Pearl piccolo quite considerably.

I had wanted to use those gift cards earlier, but I am so glad I saved them for the special occasion. Having those gift cards took away some of the “heat” from splurging on a new instrument for myself.

Whether you want to save for a new instrument or for a nicer music stand, gift cards are an easy way to set aside money and not be tempted to spend them elsewhere.

So…

Have you made a musical purchase from Amazon before? What was your experience? Leave your thoughts in a comment below!

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How to Buy Instruments Online

With websites like Amazon and eBay, it is easier than ever to buy instruments online. You can find so many amazing deals, and you can have your new instrument in a matter of days.

Gone are the days of having to trek to a music festival or visit an instrument vendor or store. You can order yourself a new instrument from your own bed. How nice is that?

Killer Harmony | Buying Instruments Online | Grey background with maroon text (Buying instruments online) and teal text (for musicians)

It’s nice…if you’re smart about it. There are some good deals out there, but there are also some not so good deals. So, I am going to give you my tips for buying instruments online. While in person is best, sometimes you have no other choice.

1. Stick with reputable brands.

There are dozens of brands of instruments on sites like Amazon, but a lot of them are of bad quality. They are cheaply made instruments, which is why those instruments are usually really cheap.

If you are searching for a flute or piccolo, stick to brands like Yamaha, Pearl, or Jupiter, among others. These instruments will cost more than the  “Sky” or “Band Director Approved” instruments.

Going with a reputable brand means you will get a better quality instrument. It will last longer, and the cost will be worth it over time. Please do not buy those $100 instruments; they are not worth your time or money.

2. Read the reviews.

Read the reviews of the instrument before you purchase. If you can, contact someone you know who has played the brand and model you are considering. Or ask a private teacher for recommendations.

In many cases, the reviews can tell you a lot about the instrument. If you cannot test the instrument out before buying, you want to make sure you are getting a good value.

If you are on Amazon, you can even check out the Q&A section to see if there are any questions with helpful answers. Reviews may seem silly, and of course you should ignore the more biased ones. Some reviews can be really helpful, though.

3. Look at specialty websites.

There are so many online music stores, both general and instrument specific. Even if you plan to buy from Amazon, check with these other sites to see if the instrument you want is available.

For flutists, websites like FluteWorld and the Flute Center of New York have a ton of good brands in stock. I ended up purchasing a piccolo from Amazon, but I had seen it on flute specific websites. I also had a recommendation from a flute teacher.

These specialty sites will probably have a higher shipping fee, but a lot of them do have trial periods. If you decide you don’t like what you ordered, you can send it back. That is a great perk when you are unsure of what you want.

4. Check the shipping terms. And track your package.

What I mean by this is that you should be aware of how your instrument will be shipped. I personally would go for the fastest shipping you can. Yes, it adds to the cost. But the last thing you want is to have your instrument sitting in a warehouse without temperature controls.

You should also do your best to be home the day your instrument arrives. That might contradict my last piece of advice, but it’s almost more important. So priority goes to being home on delivery day. If you are out running errands or working all day, you won’t be able to get your instrument inside and away from crooks.

Not only do you want to get your instrument out of the elements quickly, but you don’t want to have a package sitting on your doorstep that will attract thieves.

5. Know the return policy.

This goes for anything you buy online. If you buy from somewhere that does not have a trial period, you still should know whether you can return the instrument if you are unhappy.

How long do you have to make a return? Do you have to pay for shipping? How do you ship it back? While you will hopefully find something you love, you still want to be aware of the terms in case you don’t end up liking the instrument or in case something is wrong with it.

6. Buy in person when you can.

I wrote this post for the people who can’t buy an instrument in person. If you have the option to buy an instrument that you want in person, do that.

You’ll save on shipping, and you can test the instrument out before you even purchase it.

For when you can’t buy an instrument in person, I hope these tips help for buying an instrument online. Definitely read up on everything you can regarding the instrument you want to purchase and educate yourself and the shipping and return policies.

7. Enjoy your new instrument!

Buying a new instrument is exciting! So be sure to enjoy your new purchase. While some purchase methods are easier or harder, no matter how you buy, have fun.

So…

Have you bought an instrument online before? What was your experience like? Let me know in the comments, and be sure to subscribe for more exclusive tips and musings sent straight to your inbox!

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Top 3 Social Networks for Musicians

A couple of weeks ago, I published a basic overview of how musicians can use social media. It is a great introduction to using social media professionally, but it doesn’t go into detail about which social networks you should focus on.

If you haven’t read that post yet, I suggest you catch up now.

Killer Harmony | Social Networks for Musicians |Social media is overwhelming. There are so many choices. Here are the top 3 social networks for musicians. Social networks are great tools for musicians.

In today’s post, I am going to talk about three social networks that work for most musicians. Not all networks will work for all users, and you should experiment yourself to see what works. However, this post can help you get started.

Why Only 3?

I chose to only list the top three networks, because you don’t need to use more than that. There comes a point where social media can be too much to handle. When you are starting out or changing your strategy, it is best to focus on three networks or fewer.

These three networks are all good for musicians for networking and sharing clips of their work. They do function a bit differently, though. This set up of each is not always the same.

Now, if one or all of these networks don’t work for you, you do not have to keep using them. So, without further ado, here are the top social networks for musicians.

Instagram

If you only want to give one of the networks in the post a try, make it Instagram. There is a thriving community of musicians on there. You can follow others and watch videos of your favorite artists.

Show off your work space to the world. Post your own photos or videos of you playing your instrument. Share an excerpt of an upcoming composition.

With the correct use of hashtags, you can do great things on Instagram. You can share your post with a lot of hashtags. Be careful, there is a reported limit of thirty; after that, your account won’t alway show up.

Instagram is the most visual and musical of the more traditional social networks. Yes, you have YouTube, which is a great tool, but it is more of a database than a network.

Sharing videos on your Instagram account is a great way to start building a performance portfolio. You can share short clips, limited to a minute long, and you can shoot those videos on your phone. No crazy editing needed.

Facebook

Facebook is probably the most popular social network available. It seems like everyone and their mother has a Facebook profile these days. Not only that, but there is a lot you can do with the platform.

For one, you can share your music and recordings with your friends and family. While they may not be able to hire you, they can share your work. Word of mouth is powerful, even with the internet.

Another way you can use Facebook as a musician is with Facebook groups. You can share helpful information and your own recordings with others. Groups can be a great way to network with others and find music groups to join or gigs to play.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is often misunderstood. It is usually nicknamed “the professional Facebook.” That explanation is fairly simple, but it doesn’t cover everything.

With LinkedIn, you can write articles and share them to your profile. Even if you are not a great writer, articles can showcase your expertise on a subject. They are also a good way to keep a sort of blog without needing a full website.

The main draw of LinkedIn that you won’t find on other networks is the job board. Once you fill out your profile, you will be shown job recommendations based on your skills. This can be a great way to find work.

Overwhelmed?

It’s okay. Social media is crazy, especially because it is constantly changing. Facebook and Instagram are always switching up their algorithms, and they even force business pages to pay to reach their followers.

That is why I have created a few resources to help you. First off, I offer social media and website management services. If you want to build your social media presence but don’t have the time to, I’m your girl.

Soon, I will be releasing an eBook that covers everything you need to get started with social media. I talk about the most common networks, how and what you should post, and a whole lot more. So subscribe below so that you don’t miss out on an awesome resource!

So…

I know that social media is a lot to take in. It takes time to learn how it all works. So please, comment below with your biggest issue when it comes to social media. Any information you give will help me to offer better advice to all of you.

Thanks for reading!

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Online Resources and Websites for Music

When it comes to music, the internet is filled with resources to help us out. There are websites like YouTube where you can find free recordings of pieces, online metronomes, and even sheet music downloads.

Killer Harmony | Websites for Musicians | With so many music websites, it can be hard to find the most helpful ones. I have compiled a list of websites that will help musicians of all levels.

I love using the internet to help me. I have found a lot of sheet music, music tips, and also career tips. In this post, I am going to share my favorite online resources with you. I hope you find something that helps.

Without further ado, let’s get started.

IMSLP

The International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP), or Petrucci Library, is a huge library. You can find so many different pieces from solo works to full orchestral scores. Some pieces also have audio recordings that you can download.

There is music for almost every instrument, even some obscure ones. You can search for instrumentation, composer, style, or for a specific piece. It is completely free to use, and I cannot recommend it enough.

If you want to learn a piece or practice your score study skills, IMSLP probably has what you’re looking for. The only difficulty might be finding pieces that are still protected under copyright.

8Notes

This website is great for beginner musicians and music teachers. There is a decent amount of sheet music for most of the orchestral instruments and a few others. Instruments outside the orchestra include piano, recorder, saxophone, guitar, and ukulele.

You can find music of different genres, like jazz or music for different holidays. There is also a forum and a music theory section to add to the website.

YouTube

If you need to listen to a piece of music, check YouTube. You are bound to find many recordings, some better than others. But the sheer amount of recordings, especially for popular works, means that you can hear different interpretations of the piece.

You can also listen to different recordings by some of the great players of your instrument. Listening to professionals is a great tool when learning an instrument.

Teachers can use YouTube as a way to market to students by sharing videos and recordings. Show off your skills. A YouTube channel can be a great way to attract students and clients.

Amazon

Oh, Amazon. How I love thy Prime. But seriously, Amazon is a great place to find sheet music and other music accessories. If you procrastinate buying a piece of music, Amazon Prime will deliver it in two days.

I haven’t been able to buy everything from Amazon, because they aren’t a music library, but it’s nice. I can also look for music stands, instrument stands, and other music supplies on there. They have a pen that is set up to create a music staff for you.

You need Amazon Prime in your life. If you don’t listen to anything else in this post, listen to this. Especially because you can use Amazon for more than just music.

Sheet Music Plus

I have yet to order from SMP, but I have heard good things about it. You can find music to download and music to order. I’ve seen music from all genres on there. It’s pretty cool.

The downside to using it as opposed to other sheet music websites is that the music costs money. But you can support other musicians by using it.

If you are a composer or arranger, look into this website as a way to publish your music. I am considering this for the near future, because it seems pretty cool. You can publish original music or arrangements of songs in their library and earn royalties when people purchase it.

Killer Harmony

Of course, I had to list my own blog and site. I post twice weekly about music. I share music tips and information with the goal of making music more accessible to everyone. Music, especially classical music, isn’t always as appreciated as it should be.

My dream is to pursue this thing full time and to create a valuable resource for musicians of all genres and levels. If you want to go behind the scenes, I suggest you follow me on Instagram (@KillerHarmony) and subscribe to the blog at the end of this post.

So…

Did I miss any music websites? What are you favorite music resources? Let me know in the comments!

Thanks for reading!

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